SUNDAYS
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2nd Sun Lent C
Sunday 17th March 2019


Image supplied by Kathy Curran
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Exposition

Christian conversion is promoted by conversation. This section is a response to and a development on the knowledge gained from the commentary section.

This Sunday's Exposition

I’ve often wondered why God doesn’t give more moments of mystic glory. Imagine if every time you went to Eucharist, there was a moment, even a fleeting moment, when the reality of what we were celebrating so shone through the ritual we could say, ‘We saw God! Light radiated so much we were dazzled!’ Wouldn’t we be eager to return – like Peter we would want to stay and worship? ‘More, more!’ But it doesn’t happen like that. For most of us, most of the time, our rare fleeting moments of insight into what is really happening are ‘in a glass darkly’, as St Paul put it so well...or while we are falling asleep, or in a cloud, or misunderstanding what is happening – as it was for Peter and his companions. So why is Eucharist or prayer or service of God so hum-drum??

When Peter wanted to stay in that mystic moment on the mountain, for whose sake was it? Was it to worship – thereby showing his love for God? Or was it for his own pleasure – thereby showing his love of self? Or maybe it was a mixture of both elements - thereby showing just how mixed up he was, like the rest of humanity?

Jesus didn’t really ‘have’ to suffer…did he? Couldn’t God have just made everything all right and say, ‘You are forgiven,’? But then where would that have left us. Our hearts are so flawed, so mixed up that we find it hard to believe in love unless the one professing to love us shows us in some form of ‘sacrifice’. How could we believe in the love of God if God did not come close to us, feel our weakness and sin, experience our rejection and yet continue to love us, even offering forgiveness in the midst of that rejection? That level of sacrifice is what it takes to sort out our mixed up hearts – to get us to believe in God’s true love. .
And for ourselves? Would we believe in our love for God if it came so easily? If every Eucharist was fun, a pleasure to be at, would we believe we went to show our worship to God or just to have a good time for ourselves? Yes, our sacrifice for God is real – not to show God what we can do but to show ourselves just how much God means for us.

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